Dr Glenn Bonney

Consultant

Division of Surgical Oncology (Hepatobiliary & Pancreatic Surgery), National University Cancer Institute, Singapore (NCIS)

 

Dr Glenn Bonney attained his undergraduate medical degree in 2002 (MB ChB) from the University of Leeds, United Kingdom. Having completed Basic Surgical Training he was awarded Membership of the Royal College of Surgeons of England (MRCS) in 2006, he undertook a postgraduate research degree at Cancer Research UK to identify markers in bile for malignancy of the liver, while continuing clinical work at the Hepatobiliary and Transplantation Unit at St James’ University Hospital, Leeds. His proteomic based research culminated in a Doctorate of Medicine (MD) in 2008.

 

He subsequently undertook Higher Surgical Training in Birmingham, doing his specialist training at the University Hospitals of Birmingham, one of the largest liver transplant, liver and pancreas surgery units in Europe. He became a Fellow of the Royal College of Surgeons of England in 2014 and is on the Specialist Register in the UK as well as Singapore.

 

He has numerous publications, presentations and invited lectures in hepatocellular carcinoma, colorectal liver metastasis and pancreas cancer. With this experience, he was awarded a grant by the Royal College of Surgeons England to pursue a 1 year fellowship for the investigation of the molecular biology of Hepatocellular Carcinoma at the National University Hospitals Singapore (2013/14). On returning to the UK, he completed his surgical training and following a period as a Consultant Hepatobiliary and Transplant Surgeon, he returned to the National University Hospital Singapore.

 

Dr Bonney’s primary interest is in surgery for primary and secondary malignancies of the liver, pancreas and gallbladder. His clinical research has resulted in him receiving the Presidential Award of the International Hepatopancreaticobiliary Association (Seoul 2014). He is currently principle investigator and collaborator on numerous national and international studies in liver and pancreas cancer.

 

 

 

Updated as of 21 June 2017