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5
Dec
2022

How personalised medicine improves cancer treatment

Channel NewsAsia

Scientists at NUS Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine and National University Cancer Institute Singapore are working to revolutionise the way cancer is treated by using artificial intelligence to create bespoke treatment for patients. Called Quadratic Phenotypic Optimisation Platform (QPOP), the programme determines a drug cocktail to kill the patient's cancer cells. A clinical study using QPOP-guided treatment led by Dr Anand Jeyasekharan, Consultant, Department of Haematology-Oncology, National University Cancer Institute Singapore, and A/Prof Edward Chow from the Department of Pharmacology, NUS Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine, had allowed a Stage 4 natural killer cell lymphoma patient to live cancer-free for 16 months.

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20
Nov
2022

A lab for bespoke drug treatments — where AI, researchers find ways to help cancer patients

Channel NewsAsia

A clinical study at the NUS Centre for Cancer Research, a translational research programme at NUS Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine, led by Dr Anand Jeyasekharan, Consultant, Department of Haematology-Oncology, National University Cancer Institute Singapore, and A/Prof Edward Chow, Principal Investigator at Cancer Science Institute of Singapore, had allowed Stage 4 natural killer cell lymphoma patient, Mr Donavan Koh, to live cancer-free for 16 months. The study, involving a digital medicine platform called Quadratic Phenotypic Optimisation Platform (QPOP), generated over half a million drug combinations that were possible for Mr Koh, then ranked and identified the most effective one for him. Driven by artificial intelligence, QPOP accomplished the task in the span of about six days, something that would be impossible with manual tests. 

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16
Nov
2022

Paxman limb cryocompression system to be used in SWOG Cancer Research Network study testing for preventing of chemotherapy induced peripheral neuropathy

Others

Medtech company Paxman Coolers Limited announced that the Paxman Limb Cryocompression System (PLCS) has been selected by the SWOG Cancer Research Network to be used in a prospectively designed study to prevent chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy. Since 2019, Paxman has been working in partnership with National University Cancer Institute Singapore, National University Hospital and N.1 Institute for Health at National University of Singapore in developing PLCS. 

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28
Oct
2022

Breast cancer update: AI to read mammograms, 3D nipple tattoos, promising drug combo, device to shrink tumours

Channel NewsAsia

​A/Prof Mikael Hartman, Senior Consultant, Division of General Surgery (Breast and Trauma Surgery), National University Hospital, and Programme Leader for Breast Cancer Prevention Research at NUS Saw Swee Hock School of Public Health, noted that although there is an increase in breast cancer in women aged 50 and above, it is very rare in women below the age of 35. He added that since there are minimal means to prevent the disease, efforts must be focused on finding the disease early as treatments then are less complicated with better outcomes. A/Prof Hartman also shared that he is working with several researchers to develop techniques to test specific risks for the disease. 

Channel NewsAsia Lifestyle also cited a novel combined therapy being explored by National University Cancer Institute Singapore for breast cancer treatment, using letrozole and lenvatinib. The research’s lead investigator, Prof Lee Soo Chin, Head and Senior Consultant, Department of Haematology-Oncology, National University Cancer Institute Singapore, said the findings showed that the therapy is effective in the treatment of breast cancer, even in patients whose disease is no longer well-controlled by conventional hormone therapy options. Co-investigator Dr Joline Lim, Consultant Department of Haematology-Oncology, National University Cancer Institute Singapore, added that a late phase trial is underway to compare the current standard treatment against the letrozole-lenvatinib combination.

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25
Oct
2022

Health Matters – Skin cancer: When is it more than just a bump on your skin?

Channel NewsAsia

Skin cancer is the sixth most common cancer that affects men and seventh most common cancer that affects women in Singapore. Although it is more prevalent in seniors, there has been a steady increase in skin cancer among those under the age of 65. Dr Adeline Yong, Associate Consultant, Division of Dermatology, National University Hospital and National University Cancer Institute Singapore, explained how to use the “ABCDE rule” to identify early signs of skin cancer, as well as the treatment options available for patients in Singapore.

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24
Oct
2022

本地团队获研究基金 有望扩大鼻咽癌筛查提高患者存活率 (Local team secures research grant to expand nasopharyngeal cancer screening and improve patient survival rates)

联合早报 © SPH Media Limited. Reproduced with permission

​A team of researchers led by A*STAR's Genome Institute of Singapore, National Cancer Institute Singapore, and National Cancer Centre Singapore was awarded the prestigious Open Fund-Large Collaborative Grant to establish a research programme to improve the early diagnosis and survival rate of patients with nasopharyngeal cancer (NPC). The research grant is supported by the National Research Foundation Singapore, and administered by The National Medical Research Council.

 A/Prof Thomas Loh, Senior Consultant, Department of Otolaryngology – Head & Neck Surgery, National University Hospital, and Division of Surgical Oncology, National Cancer Institute Singapore said current studies showed that screening of first-degree relatives of NPC patients was effective. He added that the new research programme would allow screening to be extended to the at-risk population in the community between the ages of 40 and 60, to identify and effectively treat early-stage disease.

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20
Oct
2022

为什么定期做乳房X光检查能救你一命?(Why regular mammograms can save your life?)

Others

An article on mammograms mentioned that National University Cancer Institute Singapore is offering $10 funding assistance from 30 November to women who are first-time mammography screeners at select National University Health System diagnostics centres. The public can also join the “Fit & Fab with National University Cancer Institute Singapore” virtual workouts throughout the month of October.

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17
Oct
2022

‘We aren’t aliens’: The unseen struggles of breast cancer patients as they return to work after treatment

Channel NewsAsia

​Dr Samuel Ow, Consultant, Department of Haematology-Oncology, National Cancer Institute Singapore, noted that some breast cancer patients continue to work while receiving treatment, while others choose to take time off work. Cancer treatment can have long-lasting residual side effects that may include fatigue and poor concentration, numbness in the fingers or toes, mental health issues, in addition to physical changes and body image issues. While the transition back to work is challenging. Dr Ow suggested that exercise, proper nutrition and keeping a positive outlook will keep side effects more manageable. With cancer rehab, patients can learn to compensate and cope with them over time. Patients who need emotional support may also reach out to the Women's Emotional Health Service at National University Hospital and other support groups. 

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5
Oct
2022

如何使用 ABCDE 规则识别皮肤癌早期迹象,患治疗方案有哪些? (How to use the “ABCDE rule” to identify early signs of skin cancer and what are the treatment options?)

Others

​Skin cancer is one of the top ten cancers in Singapore and it has been steadily increasing among those under the age of 65. Dr Adeline Yong, Associate Consultant, Division of Dermatology, National University Hospital and National University Cancer Institue Singapore, discussed the risk factors and explained how to use the “ABCDE rule” to identify early signs of skin cancer, as well as the treatment options available.

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4
Oct
2022

预防乳癌的黄金关键 (Breast Cancer Awareness Month: Why are annual mammograms important?)

Others

​From 1 October to 30 November, National University Cancer Institute Singapore will provide a subsidy of $10 for women who go to NCIS for their first mammogram.

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3
Oct
2022

被诊断患上乳癌首要做什么事?#健康娜件事 (What is the first thing to do when you are diagnosed with breast cancer?)

Others

​Dr Samuel Ow, Consultant, Department of Haematology-Oncology, National University Cancer Institute Singapore, discussed some of the things that women should do when they are first diagnosed with breast cancer. He also emphasised the importance of screening for early detection, and gave tips on how to help women return to a life of normalcy and the workplace after having breast cancer.

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2
Oct
2022

多家机构继续提供援助 适龄妇女做乳房X光检查有津贴 (Various organisations continue to offer support: Subsidies available for women of suitable age to undergo mammograms)

联合早报 © SPH Media Limited. Reproduced with permission

​In conjunction with the World Breast Cancer Awareness Month in October, organisations such as the Breast Cancer Foundation and Singapore Cancer Society will provide financial assistance to women of suitable age to encourage them to go for regular mammograms. This October and November, in addition to prevailing subsidies available, National University Cancer Institute Singapore will also be offering $10 funding assistance to women who will be going for their mammograms for the first time.

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23
Sep
2022

Lebih 650 berbasikal gagahi hujan kumpul dana bagi pesakit barah (More than 650 cyclists ride through heavy rain to raise funds for cancer patients)

Berita Harian © SPH Media Limited. Reproduced with permission

More than 650 cyclists rode a collective 38,902km to raise funds for cancer patients. The ride was the culmination of a month-long virtual cycling event called "Let's Ride! Singapore'' which aimed to promote an active lifestyle and encourage disease prevention. Organised by biotechnology company MiRXES, cyclists rode across the island and managed to raise $88,902, with the company pledging $50,000 and donating a dollar for every kilometre ridden. The money would go to the National University Cancer Institute Singapore Cancer Fund, which will use it to subsidise patients' treatments. Professor Chng Wee Joo, Director of National University Cancer Institute Singapore, said the fund supports more than 60 applications a year and aims to raise $20 million in the next three years to continue helping patients, advancing cancer research and training healthcare professionals.

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23
Sep
2022

Hummingbird Bioscience holds opening ceremony for Singapore Science Park office and research facilities

Others

​Prof Chng Wee Joo, Director and Senior Consultant at National University Cancer Institute Singapore, was among the line-up of renowned scientists and oncologists who shared their experiences in precision oncology at a symposium titled “X Marks The Spot: Treating cancer with precision” hosted by biomedical start-up Hummingbird Bioscience.  

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19
Sep
2022

Mum with colorectal cancer gets new lease of life with son's liver

Channel NewsAsia

​A team from National University Health System has successfully conducted a liver transplantation on a Stage 4 colorectal cancer patient whose cancer has spread to the liver. Madam Lim Gek Meng was initially diagnosed at Ng Teng Fong General Hospital in October 2020 and was immediately put on chemotherapy. In July 2022, Mdm Lim successfully underwent liver transplant at National University Centre for Organ Transplantation, in a multicentre initiative involving more than 50 professionals across National University Health System, including National University Hospital and National University Cancer Institute Singapore. This was Singapore's first such transplant and according to current literature, the first in the region. 

The team led by A/Prof Glenn Bonney, Consultant in National University Hospital's Division of Hepatobiliary and Pancreatic Surgery, Adult Liver Transplantation Programme at National University Centre for Organ Transplantation and Division of Surgical Oncology, National University Cancer Institute Singapore, as well as international experts, formulated a set of consensus guideline with 44 criteria to select and manage patients who are candidates for the liver transplant.

Channel NewsAsia cited A/Prof Bonney as saying that he felt privileged to be able to work in a system that can generate such care, where a Stage 4 colorectal cancer patient is able to be cancer-free following the transplant.


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