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16
Sep
2021

Health Matters – New global initiative to help colorectal cancer patients

Channel NewsAsia

A/Prof Glenn Bonney, Consultant at National University Centre for Organ Transplantation and Division of Hepatobiliary & Pancreatic Surgery, Department of Surgery, National University Hospital as well as National University Cancer Institute, Singapore, Division of Surgical Oncology, discussed how National University Health System clinicians in Singapore are leading a global initiative that could change how patients with colorectal liver metastasis are managed and treated. They have formulated a patient management algorithm or consensus guidelines, which define the specific patient groups, as well as the tests and classifications that are needed to treat them.

NUH in the NewsNCIS in the NewsNUHS in the News
15
Sep
2021

NUHS Leads Global Initiative for Precision Care of Colorectal Cancer Patients with Liver Metastasis

National University Health System

NUH Media ReleaseNCIS Media ReleaseNUHS Media Release
28
Aug
2021

For all, for life?

The Straits Times © Singapore Press Holdings Limited. Reproduced with permission

The Straits Times report discussed how changes to MediShield Life could affect the cost of cancer treatments. It cited comments by A/Prof Jeremy Lim, A/Prof Chia Ngee Choon and Asst Prof Cynthia Chen from NUS Saw Swee Hock School of Public Health ( SSHSPH), as well as Dr Chee Cheng Ean, Senior Consultant, Department of Haematology-Oncology, National University Cancer Institute Singapore (NCIS).

A/Prof Lim said that the overriding focus is on controlling costs, and that a drug deemed to be non-cost-effective at the national level might work very well for certain individuals due to their genetic make-up or other factors. Hence, mechanisms need to be firmly established to enable patients who do not fit into the framework to have easy recourse to appeal and fair consideration.

A/Prof Chia commented that the latest changes to the claims criteria will nudge patients in the direction of more cost-effective treatment and help plug the information gap that patients have regarding cancer treatment. Asst Prof Chen said that national-level negotiations may give Singapore even more bargaining power, taking into consideration the larger market share it would represent.

Dr Chee highlighted that for cancers that do not respond to conventional treatment, patients are encouraged to participate in clinical trials where there are opportunities for new treatment options.

Media ArticlesNCIS in the NewsNUHS in the News
26
Aug
2021

线上音乐会为癌症患者筹款 (Online concert to raise funds for cancer patients)

联合早报 © Singapore Press Holdings Limited. Reproduced with permission

​Lianhe Zaobao interviewed Ms Joy Loke, a student at Hwa Chong Institution and President of Hwa Chong Medical Society who, together with a team of other students from the society, collaborated with National University Cancer Institute Singapore (NCIS) to organise a live-stream charity concert earlier this month to raise cancer awareness and support financially disadvantaged cancer patients. The concert featured performances by various local artistes and talents, interviews with cancer survivors who shared their personal experience in fighting the disease, as well as NCIS doctors who shared educational knowledge about cancer screening and prevention. The concert has successfully met its fundraising target of $100,000 from the contributions of the public and corporate donors.   

Media ArticlesNCIS in the NewsNUHS in the News
20
Aug
2021

Unmet needs hurt emotional wellbeing of caregivers of cancer patients

MIMS – online

​MIMS reported that a recent Singapore study conducted with 237 family cancer caregivers (FCC) of National University Cancer Institute Singapore (NCIS) ambulatory cancer clinic patients showed that having unmet daily needs harms the emotional state of FCCs, especially during the intermediate and chronic treatment phases of the disease. According to the researchers, the study highlights the vulnerability and risk of unmet needs and negative emotional states in FCCs during critical periods of their care recipient's cancer journey and, although causal links and directions are still unclear, the need for greater attention to the needs of FCCS.

Media ArticlesNCIS in the NewsNUHS in the News
15
Aug
2021

Why jabs are critical for those with chronic issues

The Sunday Times © Singapore Press Holdings Limited. Reproduced with permission

In an interview with Straits Times on why people with diabetes or cardiac conditions such as hypertension are more at risk of severe disease if they were to get COVID-19, Prof Tan Huay Cheem, Senior Consultant, Department of Cardiology, National University Heart Centre, Singapore commented that most of these patients tend to be elderly people who are severely ill with frequent and chronic comorbidities.  He explained that COVID-19 patients with underlying heart conditions are six times more likely to be hospitalised than those without any pre-existing conditions and that their mortality rate is also 10 times higher.

On why cancer patients are more at risk of developing severe disease and if they can be vaccinated, Prof Goh Boon Cher, Senior Consultant, Department of Haematology-Oncology, National University Cancer Institute, Singapore said that patients with cancers who are receiving immunosuppressive therapy like chemotherapy or bone marrow transplant have weakened immune systems that cannot mount an adequate response to viral infection.  Patients currently on active cancer treatment should consult their oncologists for the optimal timing of the vaccinations in relation to the cancer treatment.

Media ArticlesNUHCS in the NewsNCIS in the NewsNUHS in the News
3
Aug
2021

错过乐活线上讲座 可上网免费观赏视频 (Public can catch the online zbNOW LOHAS webinar online for free)

联合早报 © Singapore Press Holdings Limited. Reproduced with permission

​The zbNOW LOHAS webinar cancer series organised by Lianhe Zaobao and supported by NCIS can be viewed on Lianhe Zaobao Facebook and zaobao.sg.

Media ArticlesNCIS in the NewsNUHS in the News
2
Aug
2021

S'pore woman buys cakes, popcorn & ice-cream to thank NUH cancer centre staff on Nurses' Day

Others

Mothership reported that an NCIS patient has gifted cakes, popcorn and ice-cream to the nurses at NUH Ward 9 to thank the staff at NCIS and Ward 9 for the amazing care and love she received when she was under their care. She was diagnosed with lymphoma in 2020 and had been receiving treatment at NCIS. Her cancer went into remission in February 2020. She also highlighted the efforts of one Nurse Lee who went above and beyond to ensure that her treatment was as smooth as possible. Nurse Lee checked up on her over the weekend, and also replied to messages at odd hours when the patient had urgent queries. The patient's mother is also undergoing chemotherapy at NCIS and while Nurse Lee does not attend to the mother directly, Nurse Lee still sends messages to ask after her and drop by to check up on her. The patient added that many of the staff at NCIS are from overseas and many have not returned home to see their families. Yet, despite the pressures of the job, the nurses have always been very patient.

Media ArticlesNUH in the NewsNCIS in the NewsNUHS in the News
27
Jul
2021

越来越多人愿做基因检测 (More people are willing to do genetic tests)

联合早报 © Singapore Press Holdings Limited. Reproduced with permission

The zbNOW LOHAS webinar cancer series on July 24, a public webinar organised by Lianhe Zaobao and supported by National University Cancer Institute Singapore, featured Prof Lee Soo Chin, Head and Senior Consultant and Dr Huang Yiqing, Consultant, both from National University Cancer Institute Singapore, Department of Haematology-Oncology, and Ms Yan Yanyan, Senior Staff Nurse, National University Cancer Institute Singapore, Division of Oncology Nursing.

Prof Lee shared various facts on hereditary breast cancer, including whether genetic testing is recommended for everyone and some prevention and treatment options patients could consider. Dr Huang explained and presented on brain metastases in lung cancer. Ms Yan Yanyan, shared on the possible side effects of cancer treatment and highlighted the National University Cancer Institute Singapore patient care programmes that are available to National University Cancer Institute Singapore patients and their caregivers.

Media ArticlesNCIS in the NewsNUHS in the News
24
Jul
2021

癌症讲座三专家解惑 (Three experts answer questions at cancer lecture)

联合早报 © Singapore Press Holdings Limited. Reproduced with permission

The zbNOW LOHAS webinar cancer series on July 24, a public webinar organised by Lianhe Zaobao and supported by National University Cancer Institute Singapore (NCIS), featured Prof Lee Soo Chin, Head and Senior Consultant and Dr Huang Yiqing, Consultant, both from NCIS Department of Haematology-Oncology, and Ms Yan Yanyan, Senior Staff Nurse, NCIS Division of Oncology Nursing.

Prof Lee shared various facts on hereditary breast cancer, including whether genetic testing is recommended for everyone and some prevention and treatment options patients could consider. Dr Huang explained and presented on brain metastases in lung cancer. Ms Yan Yanyan, shared on the possible side effects of cancer treatment and highlighted the NCIS patient care programmes that are available to NCIS patients and their caregivers.

Media ArticlesNCIS in the NewsNUHS in the News
22
Jul
2021

Nasopharyngeal cancer

Channel NewsAsia

Dr Donovan Eu, Consultant, Division of Surgical Oncology (Head and Neck Surgery), National University Cancer Institute Singapore, discussed the signs and symptoms, as well as treatment options for nasopharyngeal cancer. Some common signs and symptoms include having a lump in the neck, blood in saliva, and hearing loss or blocked ears that do not go away. While some cases may require surgery, nasopharyngeal cancer is highly responsive to chemotherapy and radiation. Although it is no longer one of the top 10 cancers in Singapore, nasopharyngeal cancer remains a constant health threat to about 100 people annually.

Media ArticlesNCIS in the NewsNUHS in the News
20
Jul
2021

联合早报·乐活》线上讲座之三: 治疗癌症出现副作用 康复路上有何对策 ("Lianhe Zaobao·LOHAS" Webinar 3: Side effects during cancer treatment – what are the countermeasures on the road to recovery?)

联合早报 © Singapore Press Holdings Limited. Reproduced with permission

zbNow featured Ms Yan Yanyan, Senior Staff Nurse, Division of Oncology Nursing, National University Cancer Institute Singapore, who highlighted facts on the possible side effects of cancer treatment, ahead of a webinar organised by Lianhe Zaobao and supported by National University Cancer Institute Singapore. Ms Yan shared that studies have shown that about 80% to 86% of cancer patients would experience at least one side effect from chemotherapy or radiation therapy, with fatigue being the most common. Ms Yan elaborated that some side effects such as nausea, vomiting, constipation and diarrhoea are short term which may last for days; some such as radiation-associated skin reaction may last for weeks. There are also longer term side effects that would present even when treatments are completed, such as fatigue, and hand and feet numbness. As such, doctors or advanced practice nurses would follow up with the patients on their condition for a few years.

Media ArticlesNCIS in the NewsNUHS in the News
13
Jul
2021

《联合早报·乐活》线上讲座之三: 乳癌基因突变代代相传 如何降低患癌风险 ("Lianhe Zaobao·LOHAS" Webinar 3: Hereditary breast cancer gene mutation – How to reduce the risk of cancer)

联合早报 © Singapore Press Holdings Limited. Reproduced with permission

​zbNow featured Prof Lee Soo Chin, Head and Senior Consultant, Department of Haematology-Oncology, National University Cancer Institute, Singapore (NCIS), who highlighted facts on hereditary breast cancer, ahead of a webinar organised by Lianhe Zaobao and supported by NCIS. Prof Lee shared that the majority of people who develop breast cancer are due to environmental or hormonal influences. Cancer due to a breast cancer causing mutation is extremely rare, but individuals with family history should take note. Genetic testing is only recommended for individuals in whom there is a fairly strong suspicion of a genetic predisposition.

Media ArticlesNCIS in the NewsNUHS in the News
6
Jul
2021

《联合早报·乐活》线上讲座之三:当肺癌转移脑部有何治疗方案? (“Lianhe Zaobao·LOHAS” Webinar 3: How to treat brain metastases in lung cancer?)

联合早报 © Singapore Press Holdings Limited. Reproduced with permission

​zbNOW featured Dr Huang Yiqing, Consultant, Department of Haematology-Oncology, NCIS who highlighted facts on brain metastases in lung cancer. Dr Huang shared that brain metastases occur when cancer cells from the tumour in the lung travel through the blood stream or lymph system to the brain. She explained that the incidence of brain metastases is higher in lung cancer with epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutation and anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) rearrangement, in which 50% to 60% will develop brain metastases over the course of their disease.

Media ArticlesNUH in the NewsNCIS in the NewsNUHS in the News
5
Jul
2021

CNA938 Health Matters

Others

​In an interview with CNA938, Prof Tan Huay Cheem, Senior Consultant, Department of Cardiology, National University Heart Centre, Singapore (NUHCS) spoke on balloon angioplasty, a procedure used to treat narrowed or blocked arteries in the heart, and how it has evolved over the years.

Media ArticlesNUH in the NewsNCIS in the NewsNUHS in the News
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